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Thumb_eggRoot Source: Egg

Thumb_eggRoot Source: Egg

What can't you do with an egg? You can't grill it, but you can boil it, broil it, fry it, roast it, scramble it, simmer it, steam it or drop it from 10 meters in a balsam wood cage. incredible The really amazing thing about the egg is the versatility of textures it can create. It can be as light as a meringue, and as dense as a pound cake. It all depends on how you rearrange an egg's proteins--break them apart and whip them full of air, or use them to bind together heavier ingredients like cream and sugar. colorblind Some chickens produce white eggs, others brown. Some are even blue. Among the common grocery store offerings, there isn't too much difference, whatever the color. put together An egg is made up of a couple of different components: a semi-permeable outer shell, a viscous "albumen" or white, and the center yolk, which is also made up of microscopic layers. Many recipes call for either the yolk or the white alone. Don't worry, separating them is is easy enough to do. sinker As eggs age, they gradually lose moisture through the pores inthe shells. So an old egg will be much less dense than a new one. You can test an egg's relative freshness by putting it in a bowl of cold water; the fresher it is, the faster it sinks. And if it floats, toss it out. no boil Don't let the name fool you. Actual boiling water is too violent for cooking eggs; the constant bubbling shifts them around, possibly cracking the shell and letting the white leak out. Eggs should be cooked in barely simmering water, 3-5 minutes for soft boiled or coddled eggs, 10-15 minutes for hard boiled. what you need A nonstick pan is almost essential for eggs. It lets you fry or scramble or make an omelet without using a lot of butter. Unless you want to, of course. For the true egg devotee, try any of the recipes in The Good Egg: More than 200 Fresh Approaches from Breakfast to Dessert. Make sure to pick up a few dozen eggs first. If you're a stickler for perfectly round fried eggs (it can't overlap your English muffin, after all), try an egg form. what you do The lightest of desserts, this Apple Snow will look graceful on any table. Try your eggs Passover- style with Matzo Brie. Think of it as Jewish French toast. When scrambled eggs grow up, they become quiche. And what little scramble wouldn't want to be an elegant Quiche Lorraine? These Spicy Baked Eggs with Tofu are great for breakfast, lunch, dinner, or that late-night craving. featured recipe This springy Pasta with Leeks, Asparagus, Mushrooms, And Fried Eggs is the featured recipe of this week's Root Source Challenge. We loved the creaminess of the cheese combined with the yolk of the egg. Congratulations to Amy and Jonny of We Are Never Full.

Thumb_3201606031_7906500812What is cream cheese?

Thumb_3201606031_7906500812What is cream cheese?

Cream cheese is a soft, unripened mixture of cream and milk that contains at least 33% fat. Its spreadable quality and mild flavor have made it a popular topping for bagels, toast and or crackers. It's also commonly used for flavor and texture in dips, omelettes, soups, frostings and cakes.  The original cream cheese is credited to New York dairyman, William Lawrence, who sold his cheese under the "Philadelphia" label because that city had a reputation for high-quality foods at that time (late 19th century). Eventually, Lawrence sold his company to the Phoenix Cheese Company of New York. Years later, it was sold again to Kraft. Cream cheese's predecessor, American neufchâtel, is experiencing a renaissance of sorts because it has less fat and a lighter texture than its more popular cousin. Distinct from French neufchâtel, which has a rind, American neufchâtel is unripened and spreadable like cream cheese.

Thumb_3182259203_83638f3f56What is pomegranate molasses?

Thumb_3182259203_83638f3f56What is pomegranate molasses?

Pomegranate molasses is made by heating pomegranate juice to evaporate its water, reduce its volume and concentrate its sweet and bitter taste and ripe fruity flavor. You can mix the syrupy molasses into cocktails, add it to salad dressings, marinades, sauces and glazes, or just drizzle it over grilled or roasted meats. Finding a bottle of pomegranate molasses used to mean a trip to local Middle Eastern market, but now it's widely available at all kinds of grocery stores. Recipe: Oysters With Pomegranate Mignonette (hogwash) Recipe: Duck Breast With Pomegranate Glaze (Washington Post)

Thumb_3182258759_46593a7675What is a pomegranate?

Thumb_3182258759_46593a7675What is a pomegranate?

One of the oldest fruits known to man, the pomegranate is the fruit of a small tree native to grasslands stretching from the Middle East all the way to the Himalayas and south to India. With a tough, red skin, the pomegranate is prized for its edible seeds, called arils, which have a sweet and sour taste. The name pomegranate is derived from the Latin for apple "pomum" (apple) and "granatus" (seeded). Pomegranate recipes abound in the cuisines of many Middle Eastern and South Asian cultures. Whether stirred into sauces and chutneys, juiced and blended into drinks or baked and formed into sweets and desserts, pomegranates are one of the few bright and sweet fruits of winter.  Pomegranates are good sources of vitamin C and potassium. Recent studies have shown that pomegranates contain high levels of punicalagins, compounds that could act as antioxidants in the body. Recipe: Pomegranate, Persimmon And Pecan Salad Recipe: Sliced Oranges With Pomegranate Caramelized Walnuts

Thumb_3183092466_f07a98d5baHow to prep a pomegranate

Thumb_3183092466_f07a98d5baHow to prep a pomegranate

Place the pomegranate down on its stem end; the blossom end with have a small opening. Cut firmly down along one of the 6 hexagonal ribs; hitting the rib cuts the flesh and not the seeds. Hold the fruit down firmly and move your fingers away from the bottom; the juice is very dark red and stains almost everything. Remove the split fruit to a bowl of water immediately to prevent staining of fingers and cutting boards. Holding the cut side down over the bowl of water, tap it firmly with a spoon. The seeds will fall out and sink to the bottom; the inedible pith will float to the surface. Alternatively, peel the skin off the fruit in the bowl of water. Either method works well to extract the sweet, juicy kernels.

Thumb_2966925941_55aec051b9How to make smooth custard fillings

Thumb_2966925941_55aec051b9How to make smooth custard fillings

If you want to make sure your cheesecake, ice cream, pudding, quiche filling or pumpkin pie has a smooth, uniform texture, use a fine-meshed sieve or a fine chinois to strain the custard before cooking. Using a super-fine chinois will even remove the white, string-like chalaza from the mixture. Inside the egg, the chalaza acts as a seatbelt for the yolk, preventing it from bobbing all over the developing chick; cooked in a recipe, the chalaza becomes a rubbery piece of protein that often goes unnoticed but prevents the finished dish from achieving its nirvana of smoothness.