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Thumb_4772_Sauteed Collard Greens

Thumb_4772_Sauteed Collard Greens

Doesn't this recipe sound good? It is. If you'd like some ideas about what to eat with it, click on the "goes with..." tab to the left. For the lowdown on ingredients, techniques and tools, click on "related tips."

Thumb_4773_Sauteed Collard Greens With White Beans And Lemon Zest

Thumb_4773_Sauteed Collard Greens With White Beans And Lemon Zest

To prep the collard greens, fold each leaf in half and slice off and discard the stem. Stack all the leaves together, and thinly slice them crosswise.

Thumb_339_How to dry your greens

Thumb_339_How to dry your greens

Whenever you're planning to cook a big batch of greens (collards, mustards, kale, etc.), dedicate a couple of clean kitchen towels for their prep. First, fill a large bowl with cold water and submerge the greens. Swish them around in the water, lift them out and repeat with another bowl of clean water. Then spread 2 large kitchen towels onto the counter, overlapping end to end. Lift the greens out of the water and shake them to remove some of the excess water. Then line the greens up on top of the kitchen towels and roll them up. If you're not ready to cook them, just put the big cylinder of greens into the refrigerator — the moist towels keep them fresh.

Thumb_videoHow to make cabbage and collards slaw

Thumb_videoHow to make cabbage and collards slaw

This spicy Southern slaw with both red and green cabbage and collard greens tastes great alone as a side dish or as a topping for burgers. If you would like to try making it yourself, just watch this video by Handmade TV for easy-to-follow directions.

Thumb_2870723680_ef78cef55aRoot Source: Escarole

Thumb_2870723680_ef78cef55aRoot Source: Escarole

what you should know Escarole is a pale, broad-leafed type of endive. Delicious and crisp when eaten fresh, this bitter green is also excellent when braised, wilted, grilled or cooked in soups. (Always be sure to give the leaves a thorough washing.) easy green The Bittman challenge: close your eyes and try to distinguish between escarole and its trendier, more expensive, red-tinted cousin, radicchio. A+ Escarole is a great source of folic acid, vitamin K and fiber, and when it comes to vitamin A, escarole tops even spinach. One medium head of escarole yields about seven cups of torn leaves. wintergreen Escarole is a winter green (along with chard, collards, mustards and kale) that thrives late in the growing season. The heart of a head of escarole is less bitter because it's been deprived of sunlight. what you need Everyone should own a copy of Marcella Hazan's Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking. (Be sure to check out her recipes for escarole torta and escarole and rice soup.) A brightly colored shallow pan is perfect for quickly sautéing escarole and then bringing the dish right to the table to serve. Tongs, our favorite kitchen tool, will do right by your escarole, whether hot or cold. what you do Juicy, tangy and still slightly crisp, wilted escarole with lemon is simple and soothing. Escarole's salad possibilities are virtually endless: serve it with chicken and mint; with beets, walnuts, and goat cheese; or with golden raisins and Dijon mustard. Parmesan and bread crumbs make a richly contrasting topping for braised greens. Grilling season is coming to a close, but fire it up one last time for some charred escarole. If you're craving something warming, try escarole soup -- with kale or with sausage. Find more escarole recipes at Cookthink.com. And if you haven't yet signed up for a free account at Cookthink, do it now!

Thumb_1443201120_58f54ed502Root Source: Mustard Greens

Thumb_1443201120_58f54ed502Root Source: Mustard Greens

what you should know Last spring, we marveled at themuddled taxonomy of mint. We're similarly impressed with the many different faces of mustard greens, which are grown and eaten all over the world. Mustard greens, in all their forms, are the leaves of the plants from which we get the seeds used to make mustard. Not surprising then that they tend to be the spiciest of the bitter greens (aka, the "cooking greens"), a group that includes kale, collards, beet greens and turnip greens. changing flavor Baby mustard greens start narrow and peppery, "like fresh salad greens with a little dose of wasabi." As they grow, they get curly and more bitter.  greenskeeping Big, leafy greens always need a thorough washing. Start by submerging the leaves in a big bowl of lukewarm water. Shake them back and forth. Pull the greens out and pour off the water. Then, do the same thing again and again and again. Once you've got them clean, be sure to dry your greens before cooking them. what you need You can cook enough greens for a jamboree with this 12-quart stock pot from Cuisinart. Mustards and most other bitter greens are available year-round, and they all go well with pork. With a Bacon of the Month Club membership, you could set yourself up for an indulgent 365 days of soul food. John T. Edge is the luckiest man alive; he's director of theSouthern Foodways Alliance and author of, among many others, Mrs. Wilkes' Boardinghouse Cookbook. what you do Inspired by a similar dish at Whole Foods, Brys has fallen in love with raw mustard greens dressed with garlic mayonnaise. Left in a pot on low heat for an hour (at least), long-cooked mustard greens lose their bite and become soft. Some chili-infused vinegar reinvigorates the greens and gives some edge to their tenderness. Braised mustard greens with bacon and shallots bridge the texture-flavor gap between the leafy pungency of raw greens and the mellowness of long-cooked greens. Quickly sautéed mustards add a sharp, hot note to the sweet richness of pumpkin ravioli. Grating fresh parmesan over everything at the end adds savoriness and rounds out the dish. The hearty, bitter greens hold their shape and flavor well in this stir-fried chicken with mustard greens and garlic.