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Thumb_7584_Lentil Salad With Garlic Vinaigrette

Thumb_7584_Lentil Salad With Garlic Vinaigrette

Mustard and lentils are a classically good combination (especially alongside pork). Here, the mustard and vinegar together are a great foil to the soft, creamy and earthy lentils. For a nuttier vinaigrette, replace the olive oil with walnut oil, which mixes wonderfully with Champagne vinegar.

Thumb_8266_Pesto Pizza With Tomatoes, White Beans And Goat Cheese

Thumb_8266_Pesto Pizza With Tomatoes, White Beans And Goat Cheese

Doesn't this recipe sound good? It is. If you'd like some ideas about what to eat with it, click on the "goes with..." tab to the left. For the lowdown on ingredients, techniques and tools, click on "related tips."

Thumb_9910_Orange-Currant Scones

Thumb_9910_Orange-Currant Scones

We love the airy texture of these scones, which are soft and almost muffin-y. For all you dense scone purists, this is not the recipe for you. Sometimes we use buttermilk instead of milk, but the addition of sour cream with regular milk gives the scones that zip that buttermilk would otherwise provide.

Thumb_10752_Spelt And Spring Vegetable Salad

Thumb_10752_Spelt And Spring Vegetable Salad

Spelt is an ancient form of wheat that was favored by the Romans. In her The Provence Cookbook, Patricia Wells praises its rich, nutty flavor. This salad is adapted from her Spelt Salad With Peppers, Shallots And Parsley; we added more vegetables to capture spring, along with a splash of olive oil and lemon juice.

Thumb_11014_First-Timer's Ribs

Thumb_11014_First-Timer's Ribs

These are the ribs that prove you can do it in about 2 hours, start to finish -- and without the dreaded parboiling. Barbecue master Steve Raichlen likes a little chew to the meat, and this "smoke roasting" method, over indirect medium heat instead of the classic low-and-slow approach, is a simple way to get delectable ribs in a reasonable time. Read more about this recipe at the Washington Post.

Thumb_11393_Celeriac Remoulade

Thumb_11393_Celeriac Remoulade

The prevailing flavor of celeriac is celery, but a milder, nuttier flavor than the crispy stalks provide. Some people taste notes of anise. It’s in the same family as carrots, coriander, cumin, fennel, parsley and lovage. Read more about this recipe at VeganYumYum.

Thumb_16447_Spicy Seafood Pie

Thumb_16447_Spicy Seafood Pie

This homey seafood pie would be a great way to use up leftover curried sweet potatoes.  This recipe is part of Andrew Schloss's Sunday Dinners.

Thumb_18072_Chard And Ricotta Ravioli With White Wine Butter

Thumb_18072_Chard And Ricotta Ravioli With White Wine Butter

In this dish, homemade ravioli stuffed with verdant Swiss chard and silky ricotta is tossed in a white wine butter sauce. If you don't feel like making fresh pasta, try making the ravioli with store-bought wonton wrappers.

Thumb_16858_Braised Salsify And Jerusalem Artichokes

Thumb_16858_Braised Salsify And Jerusalem Artichokes

Salsify is a hard-to-find vegetable with a faint oyster taste. If you can't find it, double the amount of Jerusalem artichokes (also called sunchokes). Read more about this recipe at the Washington Post.

Thumb_21548_Basic Brandy Cobbler

Thumb_21548_Basic Brandy Cobbler

Feel free to substitute spirits, liqueurs and garnishes of your choosing. This is one drink where you literally call the shots. This recipe comes from Rob Chirico's Hair of the Dog. For more of Rob's great cocktails, buy his Field Guide to Cocktails.

Thumb_21812_Ann Amernick's Mocha Custard

Thumb_21812_Ann Amernick's Mocha Custard

All the yolks in this custard make it more akin to a creme brulee base than the softer pastry cream traditionally used to fill napoleons. It must be sufficiently chilled before it can be cut into squares. If you don't want to bother with puff pastry (even the store-bought frozen variety), the custard squares would also be perfect with shortbread or other crisp cookies.

Thumb_22017_Cranberry Quince Sorbet

Thumb_22017_Cranberry Quince Sorbet

Quinces are like apples’ upscale cousins – tarter, rosier, more gussied up and elegant. When picking a quince, choose the yellowest-skinned fruit you can find. The green fuzzy ones aren’t quite ripe yet – not that you could tell by tasting, since even a ripe quince is too tart to eat raw. This is a sorbet, a real vegan treat, but when you put it in your mouth, it’s hard to believe that it contains no dairy. The creaminess is astounding.


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